5, 6, 8, Even 10 Mistakes Parents Make In Feeding Children

Apparently experts can’t agree on the number of mistakes parents are making in food choices for their children but one thing is for sure, according to these expert resources:

Parents are making plenty of them.

Cooking Light magazine says there are 8 common mistakes, starting with force feeding:

http://www.cookinglight.com/eating-smart/nutrition-101/feeding-toddlers

Internet Mom Guru, Joy Bauer has 7 mistakes listed on her website, starting with encouraging children to clean their plates at mealtime:

http://www.joybauer.com/healthy-living/feeding-kids.aspx

The New York Times states there are 6 mistakes, beginning with not allowing children in the kitchen while Mom and/or Dad are preparing the meal:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/15/health/healthspecial2/15eat.html

The online magazine, postitiveparentingsolutions.com says there are 5 common yet fixable mistakes:

http://www.positiveparentingsolutions.com/parenting/5-of-the-most-common-and-fixable-feeding-mistakes-parents-make

And website parents.com weighs in on the subject with 10 mistakes parents make, calling their 10 the “biggest” 10 over all others:

http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/feeding/problems/biggest-mistakes-parents-make/

Parents do this because, well, they’re parents of a new age  – one that is determined to see that their children’s health starts with eating what they think is right and on a time schedule they think is best for their children. But there are times when parents’ involvement could do more harm than good.

“Micromanagement goes against natural development,” says clinical psychologist and author Marc Nemiroff, PhD. “It takes away the child’s experience and impedes learning how to handle himself in the world. Part of the job of the parent is not to do everything for the child, but to help him do things more and more independently.”

Many parents are overly concerned about what their children eat, Nemiroff says. “If a child is truly not eating enough and losing weight, that’s worth discussing with your pediatrician. But when you have a picky eater who gets sufficient protein, does it really matter?”

Arguing over food can set up an unhealthy power struggle, says Ruth A. Peters, PhD, a clinical psychologist and author of the parenting manual, Laying Down the Law. Peters cautions parents against becoming “control freaks” at meal time.

“If the kid wants last night’s pizza for breakfast, that’s OK. If the kid won’t try a new food, so what? It’s OK to go along with the kid’s quirks,” Peters said.

Parents, how does all this sound to you?

0813-AFC Memphis-Dangler 11x17 LR copy 2

 

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